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Copyright Gwinnett Grizzly Bear Association of Nursing Students, Georgia Gwinnett College - 2019 - All Rights Reserved

Resolutions Submitted

from GGBANS

RESOLUTIONS 2016

The following resolutions were adopted by the 2016 NSNA House of Delegates

March 30 - April 2, 2016

Orlando, Florida

TOPIC:

INCREASING AWARENESS OF THE NEED FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AFTER AGING OUT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS

SUBMITTED BY:

AUTHORS:

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

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Georgia Gwinnett College, Lawrenceville, GA

Carson Farrell, Ana Griffin, Cristina Peralta, and Nicole Weatherby

the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates every state to provide free and appropriate public school education for students ages 3-21; and

once the individuals with developmental delays reach the age of 22, there is no longer an obligation for states to assist in the students’ development, referred to as “aging out”; and

these “aged out” students, which include 200,000 autistic teenagers becoming legal adults over the next five years, will not be able to receive IDEA benefits; and

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WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

RESOLVED,

RESOLVED,

RESOLVED,

RESOLVED,

parents of “aged out” developmentally disabled children are left to find programs for educational opportunities and social interactions; and

“aging out” pushes young adults into an inadequate system for disabled adults that has few resources to aid in the transition to adulthood in the local communities; and

with the number of children diagnosed with a developmental disability continuing to rise, many are ill-prepared to successfully approach adult life through a lack of information on subjects such as independent living, acting in mature social interaction, recreational activities, career and employment, health and safety, and decision-making actions; and

those with developmental disabilities are seen to perform best in a structured, repetitive routine, but due to the inadequacy of options found in the community, many parents are left having to keep them at home where developmental regression is risked; and

according to a 2012 study by the American Academy of Pediatrics, a majority of developmentally disabled adults did not work or attend school after graduating from high school and lived with their parents, while only a small percent received only some therapy or no services at all; and

it was found that many families who are raising developmentally disabled adults are single-parent families; therefore be it

that the National Student Nurses’ Association (NSNA) demonstrate its ongoing commitment to increase awareness of family strain and need of support for young adults with disabilities and promote awareness of the need for nationally standardized programs that focus on encouraging and supporting individual personal growth for the young adults who have aged out by publishing an article on this topic in Imprint, if feasible; and be it further

that the NSNA encourage its constituents to increase awareness of creating a well-developed transition plan for developmentally delayed adults upon graduation through breakout sessions at MidYear Conference and Annual Convention, if feasible; and be it further

that the NSNA encourage its constituents to advocate for the services currently provided by complex health and social service systems to become easier to navigate; and be it further

that the NSNA send a copy of this resolution to the American Nurses Association, the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International, the Health Resources and Services administration, and all others deemed appropriate by the NSNA Board of Directors.

IN SUPPORT OF ADVOCATING FOR NURSING CARE COORDINATION WITH CHILD PROTECTIVE SERVICES CHILD DEPENDENCY CASES

Georgia Association of Nursing Students, Atlanta, GA

TOPIC:

SUBMITTED BY:

AUTHORS:

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WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

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WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

WHEREAS,

RESOLVED,

RESOLVED,

RESOLVED,

RESOLVED,

Stephanie Atkinson and Angelique Noble

children in foster care are a unique and vulnerable subset of the child population with significant healthcare needs and limited access to resources; and

approximately 35-60% of foster children have at least one acute or chronic health condition; and

public health nurses have a unique interest in working with high risk and vulnerable populations; and

foster children often experience discontinuity of care prior to and during placement due to location changes, re-entry, and lack of coordination between case managers and healthcare providers regarding a child’s needs; and

medical care for this population of children can be time consuming and require extensive communication between case managers and providers to determine payment availability as well as the complications with legal court proceedings; and

foster youth are in need of intensive integrated care that includes the use of preventative measures to aid in positive health care; therefore be it

that the National Student Nurses’ Association (NSNA) advocate for the inclusion of nurses in healthcare management of children in department custody to help improve their healthcare status; and be it further

that the NSNA encourage nurses to work in collaboration with foster care case managers to assess, educate, and manage the unique healthcare needs of foster children and their families; and be it further

that the NSNA publish an article in Imprint about nursing care coordination in foster care case management and the assistance nurses provide for efficient and effective foster care case management and improved time for foster children to reunify with their families, if feasible; and be it further

that the NSNA send a copy of this resolution to the American Nurses Association, the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, the National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing, the United State Department of Health and Human Services Administration of Children and Family, the Association of Public Health Nurses, and all others deemed appropriate by the NSNA Board of Directors.